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Zippers new aluminum 88 inch cylinders ?

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  • #16
    the cast iron cylinder weigh about 12 pounds more each compared to a nikasil. There is no comparison as far as weight goes. But we actually add weight to our race bikes to increase traction on the salt so that is not a worry for us.
    Bonneville might have beat us this year but that White Bitch is going down in 2017!!!

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    • #17
      12 pounds is a lot of weight to drop from a 400 some pound drag race machine.
      Last edited by stocker; 11-03-2016, 09:33 AM.

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      • NRHS-Dan
        NRHS-Dan commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree, for a drag racing application the Nikasils are nice.

    • #18
      10% off starting today
      Never trade the thrills of living for the security of existence.

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      • #19
        Originally posted by NRHS-Dan View Post
        the cast iron cylinder weigh about 12 pounds more each compared to a nikasil. There is no comparison as far as weight goes.
        Once upon a time, the Revolution Performance website used to claim that their nikasil cylinders were 6 pounds lighter (each) than a stock 'factory' iron-lined cylinder - for a 12 pound weight saving over 'stock'. Last time I was on their website, I didn't see anything specific regarding cylinder weight but there is no reason to believe it has changed. To be honest, 6 pounds for a cast iron liner (the weight of the liner alone, NOT the entire cylinder) just seems high to me.... but until I (or someone else) weighs a factory cylinder, I'll have to believe what they claim.

        I can *easily* see the all-iron Axtell cylinders weighing 6 pounds more than a cast aluminum iron-lined original factory cylinder (and therefore 12 pounds more than a nikasil cylinder).

        According to 'Machinery's Handbook', material classified as cast iron will weigh in a range of 438 to 482 pounds per cubic foot depending on composition.
        Aluminum weighs only 168.5 pounds per cubic foot - this is only 35% of a 'heavy' cast iron.

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        • #20
          Originally posted by stocker View Post
          12 pounds is a lot of weight to drop from a 400 some pound drag race machine.
          If the weight saved is 12 pounds x 2 cylinders = 24 pounds, that is basically 6% of the weight of the entire bike.
          Considerable in a drag race.

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          • #21
            We run Axtell iron cylinders on both drag bikes, because of the ungodly amount of compression and high octane fuel we run. That is the limitation for aluminum cylinders.

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            • #22
              the iron lined cylinders flex more as well. On an 88" that the cases are bored that can lead to case cracking during hard launches. We had that happen to several of our race bikes when using Nikasil and iron lined 88" XL cylinders. After about the 5th time we decided that the weight savings was not worth it and have used all cast iron ever since.
              Bonneville might have beat us this year but that White Bitch is going down in 2017!!!

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              • #23
                Many drag racing XLs have to run a weight ballast anyway, so cast iron cylinders are a great way to add weight just forward the low center of gravity for better launch and handling characteristics compared to nikasil cylinders and a larger ballast.

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                • #24
                  Finally, a damn near correct answer as far as drag bikes. Now this just relates to the faster bikes. The Aluminum will actually benefit a slower lower powered bike.

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                  • #25
                    Okay, I *finally* got around to weighing a Revolution Performance (Millennium Technologies) nikasil / aluminum cylinder.... I even took 'great' pictures to post here. Stupid me, my 'great' pictures were taken with my Canon camera - and I neglected to change the settings on the camera so that the file size would 'work' here.... I can't even do a crop edit that will make them small enough!

                    2443 grams (that would be 5 pounds, 6 ounces) for the front cylinder

                    This is the 3.812 inch bore size for 88 cubic inches. I only weighed the front, I would expect the rear cylinder weight would be within a few grams.

                    I am NOT building this bike to drag race. It will have a 'street' tire, not a drag slick. I anticipate there will be a few somewhat 'hard' launches (mainly against 'big twins' that think they are up against a 'girls bike' at the stoplight), but not a daily occurrence. This bike will not be used for maximum speed events. The engine will see a self-imposed redline around 6500 rpm. There will be no nitrous, turbocharger, or supercharger for artificially created extreme cylinder pressures - strictly naturally aspirated with a 10.5 : 1 compression ratio. I just want a torque monster with great roll-on acceleration, NOT a race bike.

                    I don't think I have to be worried about flexing the cases enough to crack them.... in *MY* application. If I'm wrong, it won't be the first time I've learned a lesson the hard way....

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                    • #26
                      Truth be they are the tits for a street bike. They last forever if the bike is tuned correctly...do not ever let it run lean. Indian uses Naksil cylinders and my bussy has over 147,000 miles on his chief...no problems. They are not the best deal for drag racing, but I know folks that are running every weekend and don't have problems.

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