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So, I will get to see and install the 1275 kit... (I didn't buy it)

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  • So, I will get to see and install the 1275 kit... (I didn't buy it)

    Dude I know is bringing his bike and a new 1275 kit to the shop for install .Now everyone that knows me should also know I come from the day before the 1250 kits; When we would buy cylinders with extra thick liners, get pistons and use a boring bar and build our own 1250's. The only sight unseen problem I may see is that I can't picture high tensile steel ridding itself of heat very quickly. We'll see. There had to be a good reason no other shop has done a 1275 previously.

  • #2
    HD has done several high tensile steel liners in some of their TC 110 and 117 kits.

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    • #3
      I didn't know that. I still have a couple EVO's, they look like they will be running long after I am a goner. I never caught on to the Twinkie. I had bad luck with the one I bought. Dude has the parts so I will be wrenching it together soon.

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      • #4
        I hear ya, not my cup of tea either. I like the new Milwaukee 8, except the chain driven cam, which was required to pass noise restrictions. But it'll be a long while before I have either. If I want the added complexity and maintenance of chain driven cams, I'll opt for an EBR instead. But I like my Evo/XLs.

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        • #5
          I have a 1988 Heritage EVO that the odometer quit working at 245,218 miles; It's still running, and besides wearables and minor fixes,it has never left me sitting. I have a FXR cop bike I bought at the New Orleans Police Auction; It will be running long after I am gone. When I first saw the rubbermount sportster, I thought damn, that looks like an FXR, except better. I don't like all the electronic crap on the new bikes. The ECU, map sensor and carb is the best setup they ever had. Simple and reliable.

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          • #6
            I can appreciate the simplicity of the older setups but I was doing IT before I became a mechanic. I love the fact that I can datalog and tune my Buells with a laptop instead of changing jets on a hot motor.

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            • #7
              If I end up with a fi bike, which is possible, I'll just learn to do it. I have TC 88 on the sportsters and got a handle on making my own maps.

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              • #8
                So.....saw the kit, looks good. Pretty much looks like the Harley race shit. I don't know anyone that rides their big bore Screamin Eagle Race stuff on the street. I have concerns about ring seal and cooling. Steel gets way hotter than cast iron. Will give report after break in and 500 mile and 1000 mile rides

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                • #9
                  It will be interesting to see how this kit does long term. S&S is now offering the steel liners as well for the big twins.
                  Bonneville might have beat us again this year but that White Bitch is going down in 2018!!!

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                  • #10
                    I wonder how they are holding them inside the aluminum ? Like I said, guys I know that run the Moco stuff, just race it. I don't know anyone using them on the street. Dude I know at the Harley shop told me Harley only recommends them for race use. Steel gets real hot and doesn't relieve itself of the heat like cast iron does. My brother was a metal scientist ( I guess ) for timkin and we had this discussion once about the Moco's stuff. He didn't think they would get much mileage. I'll see about oil and such for the 500 miles and 1000 miles. Kinda curious how much oil is gonna pass those rings.

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                    • #11
                      If the casting is similar to the manufacturing of the cylinders on the 1250 kits, liner will never separate. The way they are cast together and thick is incredible, especially compared to the Harley cylinders. When I was at NRHS, we had an NRHS 1250 cylinder and an HD 1200 cylinder cut in half, and it was night and day difference. I'm sure Dan still has those somewhere.

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                      • #12
                        There are a couple good manufacturers of the 1200 cylinders with the extra thick liners. We were doing 1250 motors before it was cool. We have our own little machine shop, nothing cnc, but it is all in the tooling and measuring anyway. We do our own cases with a jig that Jim helped us with years ago. It isn't hard if you have the machines and tooling. The Sportster cylinders are even thinner. As far as high tensile strength steel, I don't know if it is cast as iron is. I think it is more of an extrusion process. Either or, I don't believe any little hp gained by 25 more cc's isn't power that couldn't be found elsewhere. If some of these 1250 Hammer dudes would bolt a LSR pipe in they would see some significant gains. But, they won't because the don't like the Brother Speed gang. Personally, I don't think there is a better person for sportster heads than John O'Keefe.

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                        • #13
                          Personally, I will slam a set of xb9 pistons into a 1200 low geared bike, some decent heads and cams carb, and run like a raped ape, way cheaper. Faster and cheaper is always better. The set up seems to run and hold together well on the 06 rubbermounts. Guess they got the good cranks.

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