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Brake lines and rotors

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  • Brake lines and rotors

    http://www.galferusa.com/brake-lines...g-motorcycles/

    well I like these guy's stuff !! what brought me to them was the quick disconnect brake fitting ....why....well I am in the process of fitting a hack on my 08 and I do need a quick disconnect for the car side of things...well after talking with them and looking around at their stuff on track scoots, and all the great comments about the quality and performance from racers, I was sold.

    The pricing is excellent and they do make all kinds of stuff for our sportsters and Harley's in general and for Buells. So I placed my order.Unfortunately I had to go trough a local distributor (one of them greedy ones ) but still better then the local moco.



    Never trade the thrills of living for the security of existence.

  • #2
    Let me know what you think once you've got them, Frank. I want to replace mine, so I'm curious about the experience with the Galfers.

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    • #3
      I will Liz....I know some guys here that have them and they are excellent quality !!
      Never trade the thrills of living for the security of existence.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Frank View Post
        what brought me to them was the quick disconnect brake fitting ....why....well I am in the process of fitting a hack on my 08 and I do need a quick disconnect for the car side of things...
        You plan to run a brake on the outboard wheel of the sidecar, and want to be able to disconnect this part of the hydraulic circuit from the 'main bike' rear wheel brake system ???

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        • #5
          Originally posted by show'n'go View Post

          You plan to run a brake on the outboard wheel of the sidecar, and want to be able to disconnect this part of the hydraulic circuit from the 'main bike' rear wheel brake system ???
          Ya that's about it....that way if I have to remove the car for any reason I don't end up doing a brake bleed every time...plus I also have to install a brake limiter for the car side of things.
          Never trade the thrills of living for the security of existence.

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          • #6
            Frank, are you going to do a write up on your sidecar project? I am really interested in doing the same thing and want to see exactly what is involved. Please include lots of pics if possible.

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            • show'n'go
              show'n'go commented
              Editing a comment
              Totally agree with Terry, a write up and pictures are a must!

          • #7
            Originally posted by Frank View Post
            I also have to install a brake limiter for the car side of things.
            This 'limiter' of which you speak.... is this the same as a proportioning valve ???

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            • Frank
              Frank commented
              Editing a comment
              Some people reference to them with that name....I can show ya what the car looks like as it sits.

          • #8
            The car....I got that thing used.....the guy had it on for about a 100 miles....I made him an offer and he said sure,where do you want it delivered...



            Last edited by Frank; 03-25-2016, 06:06 PM.
            Never trade the thrills of living for the security of existence.

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            • #9
              Originally posted by Frank View Post

              Ya that's about it....that way if I have to remove the car for any reason I don't end up doing a brake bleed every time...plus I also have to install a brake limiter for the car side of things.
              I've no experience with them, but I know some heavier tow behind trailer homes are equipped with electric braking... would have to read up on them but I am guessing still hydrolic with electronic actuator... may solve quick connect problem for you. probably have to fabricate it yourself as more than likely ones on market are too large for your purpose.

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              • #10
                The cost and fitment of what you're talking about would be counter productive....and the least wiring between the two units the better....disc brake is used on the car...very easy set up with one hydraulic line running over... works with the rear brake of the scoot or if a guy wants to fab a little you get put a second brake pedal beside the rear brake one and have a separate braking system all together....so very many diff. ways ,but I'll stick with what is proven and true.....good idea tho electric over hydraulic.
                Never trade the thrills of living for the security of existence.

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                • #11
                  Originally posted by Frank View Post
                  The cost and fitment of what you're talking about would be counter productive....and the least wiring between the two units the better....disc brake is used on the car...very easy set up with one hydraulic line running over... works with the rear brake of the scoot or if a guy wants to fab a little you get put a second brake pedal beside the rear brake one and have a separate braking system all together....so very many diff. ways ,but I'll stick with what is proven and true.....good idea tho electric over hydraulic.
                  Yeah I just cant imagine a quick disconnect for hydrolic, seperating lines would mean bleeding again when reassembling.

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                  • #12
                    I know that when you change from a single disc / single caliper front brake setup to a twin disc / twin caliper front brake setup, you use a different bore size in the master cylinder (larger) to accommodate the additional brake fluid that must be displaced to actuate the second caliper (while retaining similar brake lever range of motion and 'feel').

                    I think you might have to run a second rear master cylinder.... you don't need a second brake pedal, just make / modify the linkage setup so the single pedal actuates both cylinders as well as make some sort of bracket / mount that places the two master cylinders side-by-side. The benefit of using the second master cylinder is that this separates your rear system into two, leaving the original 'bike' system untouched.

                    With a 'quick connect' to the 'sidecar' system, I still think you would have to bleed the 'sidecar' caliper each time you re-connect. But you would not have to mess with (or worry about) the 'bike' system because it remains intact and unmodified....
                    A pressure-bleeder at the master cylinder lid/cap/cover (whatever you want to call it) would make it quick and easy for a single person to bleed the sidecar caliper.
                    Just some things to consider....

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                    • #13
                      The reason why I went with Galfer is bcause there is no air contamination of the system and just to make sure...all ya have to do is put one drop of brake fluid on the connection prior to doing the hook up and no air enters the system.....done it many times.
                      as for the bigger master...no need with the limiting valve ,not only you can control the amount of force applied to the car brake,but you can also lock the brake with the limiting valve.....using it as a park brake.

                      For the second brake pedal you can control the car brake to help in turns ,which is a premium on sharp corners at speed You have to remember, piloting a hack is a total diff. experience and science .Lots of people give up soon after fitting one on their scoot bcause they scare themselves or they didn't set it up correctly.....for me it was a good thing ,the fellow I got it from ,did exactly that !!
                      I still need a 5 degree triple tree...but with the dollar exchange rate,it makes that very expensive....so I'm still looking until I find something reasonably priced with exchange rate.
                      Never trade the thrills of living for the security of existence.

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